Scientists find indistinct lines of holes 1.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.

Shocked scientists have discovered ‘perfectly connected’ holes in the ground 1.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean that look like man-made excavations.

  • Explorers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found some unexplained holes on the sea floor 1.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.
  • “These holes have been reported from the region before but their origin remains a mystery,” the scientists said in a Facebook post asking for help from users.
  • Users say these holes can be the natural result of mechanical rover, crabs, aliens or sediment and water passing through the seabed.
  • The Mid-Atlantic Range runs the length of the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and stretches for 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world.

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Scientists discovered some unknown, mysterious holes in the seafloor 1.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean – and asked Facebook users to help identify the unique indentations that make up the straight line.

‘Okay Facebookers, time to take off those scientist hats!’ He wrote on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ocean Exploration Facebook page. Page.

‘On Saturday’s #Okeanos dive, we observed several of these sub-lines of holes in the sediment. These holes have been reported from the region before, but their origin remains a mystery. While they look almost man-made, the small piles of sediment around the holes make them look like they were dug out by something.’

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'On Saturday'S #Okeanos Dive, We Observed Several Of These Sub-Lines Of Holes In The Sediment.  Noaa Scientists Wrote On Facebook That These Holes Have Been Reported From The Region Before, But Their Origin Remains A Mystery.

‘On Saturday’s #Okeanos dive, we observed several of these sub-lines of holes in the sediment. NOAA scientists wrote on Facebook that these holes have been reported from the region before, but their origin remains a mystery.

The Explorers Are Part Of Noaa'S Voyage To The Ridge 2022, A Series Of Three Oceanographic Expeditions Involving Mapping And A Remotely Operated Vehicle To Gain A Better Understanding Of The Deep-Water Regions Of The Mid-Atlantic Ridge. .

The Explorers Are Part Of Noaa'S Voyage To The Ridge 2022, A Series Of Three Oceanographic Expeditions Involving Mapping And A Remotely Operated Vehicle To Gain A Better Understanding Of The Deep-Water Regions Of The Mid-Atlantic Ridge. .

The explorers are part of NOAA’s Voyage to the Ridge 2022, a series of three oceanographic expeditions involving mapping and a remotely operated vehicle to gain a better understanding of the deep-water regions of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. .

'What Is Your Hypothesis?'  They Asked Users About Vents Near The Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Indicating A Very Wide Range Of Responses.

'What Is Your Hypothesis?'  They Asked Users About Vents Near The Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Indicating A Very Wide Range Of Responses.

‘What is your hypothesis?’ They asked users about vents near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, indicating a very wide range of responses.

The explorers are part of NOAA’s Voyage to the Ridge 2022, a series of three oceanographic expeditions that include mapping and a remotely operated vehicle to explore the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Azores Plateau and around the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone. A better understanding of deep water areas can be obtained. .

‘What is your hypothesis?’ They asked users about holes near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

More than 60 Facebook users commented and provided a range of different ideas on how to create striking, yet uniform-looking indentations in the ocean floor.

‘I wonder if a company is taking samples of the sea floor,’ one user wrote. ‘This can explain the spacing of straight lines and holes. Especially if you’ve seen others in the region. There’s only one thing, everything else around him doesn’t seem to have bothered him.’

One Facebook User Wrote, 'I Wonder If A Company Is Taking Samples Of The Sea Floor.  'It Can Explain The Spacing Of Straight Lines And Holes.'  Pictured Above Is The Isa Fogbow Above The Fantail Of Noaa'S Okeanos Explorer Vessel

One Facebook User Wrote, 'I Wonder If A Company Is Taking Samples Of The Sea Floor.  'It Can Explain The Spacing Of Straight Lines And Holes.'  Pictured Above Is The Isa Fogbow Above The Fantail Of Noaa'S Okeanos Explorer Vessel

One Facebook user wrote, ‘I wonder if a company is taking samples of the sea floor. ‘It can explain the spacing of straight lines and holes.’ Pictured above is the isa fogbow above the fantail of NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer vessel

Image Above: The Deepdiscover Rover Passes Over The Volcanic Seafloor Discovered During The Fourth Dive Of The Voyage To The Ridge 2022 Expedition.

Image Above: The Deepdiscover Rover Passes Over The Volcanic Seafloor Discovered During The Fourth Dive Of The Voyage To The Ridge 2022 Expedition.

Image above: The DeepDiscover rover passes over the volcanic seafloor discovered during the fourth dive of the Voyage to the Ridge 2022 expedition.

‘Training! Fresh water bubbling from an underground source? It’s like there’s a rock underneath that breaks the flowing water in that linear fashion.’ Another user commented.

Another used, ‘might be some kind of crab’.

One user shared a meme saying: I’m not saying it was aliens… but it was aliens.

One commentator offered a less supernatural explanation: ‘It looks to me like sediment is falling, or water seeping through a crack in a geological shelf or cave ceiling.

‘I suspect that there is a gap in either ancient coral or some sedimentary rock structure for which material is being carried further away. I will start to see if there are any caves or faults in the seabed.’

The Mid-Atlantic Range runs the length of the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and spans 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world and one of the most impressive geological features on Earth.

Because most of it sits underwater, it remains largely unexplored.

It is also the site of frequent earthquakes and home to eye-catching hydrothermal vents that can form where magma provides heat as it rises to the seafloor.

The Mid-Atlantic Range Runs The Length Of The Atlantic Ocean From North To South And Spans 10,000 Miles, Making It The Longest Mountain Range In The World And One Of The Most Impressive Geological Features On Earth.  Pictured Above Is Noaa'S Okeanos Explorer Ship.

The Mid-Atlantic Range Runs The Length Of The Atlantic Ocean From North To South And Spans 10,000 Miles, Making It The Longest Mountain Range In The World And One Of The Most Impressive Geological Features On Earth.  Pictured Above Is Noaa'S Okeanos Explorer Ship.

The Mid-Atlantic Range runs the length of the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and spans 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world and one of the most impressive geological features on Earth. Pictured above is NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer ship.

The Image Above Shows The Projected Track Of The Okeanos Explorer During The Second Voyage To The Ridge 2022 Campaign.  This Series Of Expeditions Will Provide High-Resolution Information About Seafloor Features And Provide An Opportunity To Engage In Real-Time Exploration Of This Vast Uncharted Territory.

The Image Above Shows The Projected Track Of The Okeanos Explorer During The Second Voyage To The Ridge 2022 Campaign.  This Series Of Expeditions Will Provide High-Resolution Information About Seafloor Features And Provide An Opportunity To Engage In Real-Time Exploration Of This Vast Uncharted Territory.

The image above shows the projected track of the Okeanos Explorer during the second Voyage to the Ridge 2022 campaign. This series of expeditions will provide high-resolution information about seafloor features and provide an opportunity to engage in real-time exploration of this vast uncharted territory.

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