Jared Kushner was treated for thyroid cancer while working in the White House.

Jared Kushner was diagnosed and treated for thyroid cancer while working in the White House.

Kushner wrote about his cancer scare in his forthcoming memoir—which never made it to press— Breaking History: A White House Memoir.

The New York Times reported. Monday at an excerpt from the book.

In it, Kushner recalled a conversation he had with White House physician Sean Connelly during an October 2019 visit to Texas.

“The morning I flew to Texas to attend the opening of the Louis Vuitton factory, White House physician Sean Connelly pulled me into the medical cabin of Air Force One,” Kushner wrote. “Your test results came back from Walter Reed,” she said. “It looks like you have cancer, we need to schedule a surgery immediately.”

Kushner told Conley to stop — and came to his office the next day.

‘Please don’t tell anyone – especially my wife or my father-in-law,’ he said, referring to Ivanka Trump and then President Donald Trump.

Jared Kushner (Left) Speaks With Ivanka Trump (Right) At An Event At The Louis Vuitton Factory In Alvaro, Texas In October 2019.  In Her Forthcoming Memoir, She Revealed That She Had Learned Earlier That Day That She Had Thyroid Cancer.

Jared Kushner (left) speaks with Ivanka Trump (right) at an event at the Louis Vuitton factory in Alvaro, Texas in October 2019. In her forthcoming memoir, she revealed that she had learned earlier that day that she had thyroid cancer.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (From Left), Jared Kushner And Ivanka Trump Sit In The Audience For President Donald Trump'S Remarks At The Texas Louis Vuitton Plant In October 2019.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (From Left), Jared Kushner And Ivanka Trump Sit In The Audience For President Donald Trump'S Remarks At The Texas Louis Vuitton Plant In October 2019.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (from left), Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump sit in the audience for President Donald Trump’s remarks at the Texas Louis Vuitton plant in October 2019.

Jared Kushner (Left) And Ivanka Trump (Right) Are Pictured Getting Off Air Force One After A Trip To Texas Louis Vuitton.  Kushner Said In His Memoir That White House Physician Dr. Sean Conley Told Him That Morning That He Had Thyroid Cancer.

Jared Kushner (Left) And Ivanka Trump (Right) Are Pictured Getting Off Air Force One After A Trip To Texas Louis Vuitton.  Kushner Said In His Memoir That White House Physician Dr. Sean Conley Told Him That Morning That He Had Thyroid Cancer.

Jared Kushner (left) and Ivanka Trump (right) are pictured getting off Air Force One after a trip to Texas Louis Vuitton. Kushner said in his memoir that White House physician Dr. Sean Conley told him that morning that he had thyroid cancer.

President Donald Trump Carried A Louis Vuitton Bag During An October 2019 Visit To The Texas Factory, The Same Trip In Which Jared Kushner Said He Learned He Had Thyroid Cancer.

President Donald Trump Carried A Louis Vuitton Bag During An October 2019 Visit To The Texas Factory, The Same Trip In Which Jared Kushner Said He Learned He Had Thyroid Cancer.

President Donald Trump carried a Louis Vuitton bag during an October 2019 visit to the Texas factory, the same trip in which Jared Kushner said he learned he had thyroid cancer.

Jared Kushner (Center Right) Stands With Ivanka Trump (Center Left) And Their Two Children At Ivanka Trump'S Mother Ivanka Trump'S Funeral Last Week.

Jared Kushner (Center Right) Stands With Ivanka Trump (Center Left) And Their Two Children At Ivanka Trump'S Mother Ivanka Trump'S Funeral Last Week.

Jared Kushner (center right) stands with Ivanka Trump (center left) and their two children at Ivanka Trump’s mother Ivanka Trump’s funeral last week.

Both Ivanka Trump and Kushner served as senior advisers to the president in the White House.

Photos from that day show Kushner sitting with his wife at the Louis Vuitton plant in Alvaro, Texas.

They sit in the front row at President Trump’s speech, while the president checks the bag’s quality.

Kushner said her cancer was caught ‘early’ but ‘a significant part of my thyroid’ needed to be removed.

He was worried that the surgery might affect his ability to speak.

A doctor at New York Presbyterian Hospital ‘concluded that I needed surgery to remove the abnormal growth in my thyroid, and we scheduled the operation for the Friday before Thanksgiving.’

‘That way, I will waste less time in the office. My absence may not even go unnoticed. I wanted it that way,’ Kushner continued.

“This was a personal issue and not for public consumption,” Trump’s top adviser added.

Kushner said he tried to focus on work and ‘not think about the upcoming surgery or the unwanted growth in my body.’

“When I thought about it, I reminded myself that it was in the hands of God and the doctors and that whatever happened was beyond my control,” he wrote. ‘In moments, I thought to myself, ‘Will I need extensive treatment?’

He said the only people he knew were Ivanka Trump — her two aides, Evie and Cassidy — and White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney.

However, the president found out.

“The day before the surgery, Trump called me into the Oval Office and told his team to close the door,” Kushner said.

‘Are you worried about the surgery?’ he recalled asking Trump.

Kushner asked his father-in-law how he knew.

“I’m the president,” Trump replied. ‘I know everything.’

‘I understand you want to keep these things quiet. I also like to keep things like this to myself. you will be fine Don’t worry about anything with work,’ said the president. ‘We have everything covered here.’

Kushner’s book will be released on August 23.

Jared Kushner (Left) And Ivanka Trump (Right) On A Recent Visit To Morocco.  Initially, Kushner Did Not Want His Wife To Know About His Cancer Diagnosis, He Wrote In His Forthcoming Memoir.

Jared Kushner (Left) And Ivanka Trump (Right) On A Recent Visit To Morocco.  Initially, Kushner Did Not Want His Wife To Know About His Cancer Diagnosis, He Wrote In His Forthcoming Memoir.

Jared Kushner (left) and Ivanka Trump (right) on a recent visit to Morocco. Initially, Kushner did not want his wife to know about his cancer diagnosis, he wrote in his forthcoming memoir.

What is thyroid cancer?

It is one of the rare cancers that affects the thyroid gland, a small gland under the neck that produces hormones.

It is most common in people in their 30s and over 60, with women three times more likely to develop it than men.

There are around 3,900 new cases in the UK every year, or 11 every day.

Thyroid cancer is generally curable, with a 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, and in many cases completely curable.

Symptoms

  • A painless lump or swelling in the front of the neck – although only 1 in 20 neck lumps are cancerous
  • Swollen glands in the neck
  • Unexplained roughness that does not improve after a few weeks.
  • A sore throat that doesn’t get better
  • Difficulty swallowing

What causes thyroid cancer?

Thyroid cancer occurs when the DNA inside thyroid cells changes, causing them to grow out of control and form lumps.

It’s not usually clear what causes this change, but there are many things that can increase your risk.

These include:

  • Other thyroid conditions, such as an inflamed thyroid (thyroiditis) or gout – but not overactive thyroid or underactive thyroid
  • Family history of thyroid cancer – Your risk is higher if a close relative has had thyroid cancer.
  • Exposure to radiation in childhood – such as radiotherapy
  • obesity
  • A bowel condition called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP).
  • acromegaly – a rare condition where the body produces too much growth hormone.

Types of thyroid cancer

There are four main types of thyroid cancer:

  • Papillary carcinoma – the most common type, about eight out of 10 cases; It usually affects people under the age of 40, especially women
  • Follicular carcinoma – occurs in about one in 10 cases and affects middle-aged adults, especially women.
  • Medullary thyroid carcinoma – less than 1 in 10 cases; Unlike other types, it can run in families.
  • Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma – the rarest and most serious type, one in 50 cases; It usually affects people over the age of 60.