Erectile dysfunction and incontinence may be symptoms of prolonged covid, according to new research.

Erectile dysfunction and incontinence may be symptoms of prolonged covid, according to new research.

  • Researchers at the University of Birmingham analyzed 2.4 million people.
  • Included are 486,149 people with prior infection and 1.9 million people without an indication.
  • The most common symptoms include bad breath and shortness of breath.

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Erectile dysfunction and incontinence may be symptoms of prolonged covid, according to new research.

Researchers at the University of Birmingham analyzed the anonymised electronic health records of 2.4 million people in the UK.

The data, taken between January 2020 and April 2021, included 486,149 people with a previous infection and 1.9 million people with no indication.

The research was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research and UK Research and Innovation.

Erectile Dysfunction And Incontinence May Be Symptoms Of Prolonged Covid, According To New Research (Stock Image).

Erectile dysfunction and incontinence may be symptoms of prolonged Covid, according to new research (stock image).

Scientists found that the most common symptoms include loss of sense of smell, difficulty breathing, chest pain and fever. Times Reports

Others include amnesia, apraxia (inability to perform cognitive movements or commands), bowel incontinence, erectile dysfunction, hallucinations and limb swelling.

The study, published Monday in Nature Medicine, found that patients reported 62 symptoms more frequently 12 weeks after the initial infection.

Dr Shamil Haroon, senior author of the study, said: ‘This research confirms what patients have been telling clinicians and policymakers throughout the epidemic, that long-term covid symptoms are widespread and that other factors can contribute to this. cannot be fully accounted for. Lifestyle risk factors or chronic health conditions.

Researchers At The University Of Birmingham Analyzed The Anonymized Electronic Health Records Of 2.4 Million People In The Uk (Stock Image).

Researchers At The University Of Birmingham Analyzed The Anonymized Electronic Health Records Of 2.4 Million People In The Uk (Stock Image).

Researchers at the University of Birmingham analyzed the anonymized electronic health records of 2.4 million people in the UK (stock image).

“The symptoms we have identified should help clinicians and clinical guideline developers improve the prognosis of patients with long-term effects of COVID-19, and subsequently consider whether this symptom How best can the burden be handled.’

Co-author Jennifer Camardo said: ‘This study makes an important contribution to creating and furthering our longstanding understanding of the complexity and pathology of COVID.

‘This highlights the degree and diversity of symptom expression between different clusters.

‘Patients with pre-existing health conditions would also welcome additional analysis on risk factors.’

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